Driving Licences Australia and New Zealand

Information about Australia and New Zealand Driver licence

Motorhome Driving Licences Australia and New Zealand

New Zealand and Australia International Driving Licences and Permits

You can legally drive in New Zealand for up to 12 months if you have either a current driver’s licence from your home country or an International Driving Permit (IDP). After 12 months you are required to convert to a New Zealand licence. This applies to each visit to New Zealand.
In New Zealand all drivers, including visitors from other countries, must carry their licence or permit at all times when driving. You will only be able to drive the same types of vehicles you are licensed to drive in your home country. The common legal age to rent a car in New Zealand is 21 years. Some of the most basic New Zealand road rules to follow include:
– Drive on the left hand side of the road.
– All passengers and driver must wear a seat belt at all times while traveling.
– All speed limits are enforceable and are measures in kilometres/hour.
– Always give way to the right.
– While driving, you must not have a blood alchohol limit above 0.05
– Driver must not drive under the influence of drugs.Driving Licences Australia and New Zealand 2

Australia License Information for Campervan Hire

In order to hire a campervan in Australia, the person hiring the vehicle (i.e. the driver) must possess a valid and current driver’s license and must be aged between 21 and 75 years of age.
Interstate, Overseas or International driver’s licenses are acceptable, however the license must be in the English language. If the license is not in English, ensure it is accompanied with an English translation.
Australian road rules are generally easy to follow, with many of these general across the entire country. Some of the most basic Australian road rules to follow include:
– Drive on the left hand side of the road.
– All passengers and driver must wear a seat belt at all times while traveling.
– All speed limits are enforceable and are measures in kilometres/hour.
– On open roads, highways and freeways, the maximum speed limit is usually 100km/hour and on some roads, 110km/hour.
– In built up areas, the maximum speed limit is 50km/hour, unless otherwise signed.
– Always give way to the right.
– While driving, you must not have a blood alchohol limit above 0.05
– Driver must not drive under the influence of drugs.

Unsurfaced roads.
There are many thousands of kilometres of unsurfaced ‘graded’ i.e. gravel roads, made by rolling and compacting gravel. The surface varies from very good to severely corrugated. After rain some may become washed out and impassable. The maximum safe speed for any graded surface is 80 km/h where the surface is straight, flat, and in good condition, but bends must be taken much slower. In Northern Territory 2wd vehicles are not permitted on many roads, and in the wet season not even a 4×4 may be able to get through on a large number of roads. Travel within the Northern Territory or northern Queensland during or just after the rainy season is not advisable.